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TPP; Trade

TPP Poised to Improve, Not Diminish, Health Outcomes Across Asia-Pacific Nations

In a not-so-shocking revelation last week, a leaked draft of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) intellectual property (IP) chapter turned up the fact that…surprise…the United States is fighting for its domestic industries in a trade agreement.

No real news there, especially since that’s exactly what our trade representatives should be doing, namely bringing home the strongest possible deal that protects and creates jobs and fosters the kind of innovation that will secure 21st century prosperity for Americans. What is extremely disconcerting, however, is that special interest groups and the generic drug industry are lobbying for drastic cuts to intellectual property protections for innovative medicines that could have lasting consequences for both global patient health as well as U.S. jobs and economic competitiveness.

These groups are (wrongly) asserting that the IP provisions being negotiated in the TPP will weaken competition from generics and raise drug prices by establishing protections that go beyond U.S. law. But, as usually happens, groups that oppose free trade agreements never let minor inconveniences like facts get in the way of their arguments.

For instance, it’s telling when the head of one of the world’s largest generic

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TTP Ship Sailing

Getting the TPP Done Right More Important than Getting it Done Right Away

With the 19th round of negotiations toward completing the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) free trade agreement underway in Brunei, time is rapidly running out to finalize a deal before the member countries’ self-imposed deadline of the end of this year. But with the recent entry of the world’s third largest market, Japan, into the TPP and key sticking points like intellectual property (IP) protections and enforcement provisions remaining to be negotiated, one is forced to ask: What’s the rush?

It shouldn’t be all that surprising that the TPP has not progressed as fast as many would have hoped this year. We had an acting U.S. Trade Representative for several months before Michael Froman was confirmed by the Senate. And a 12-nation agreement that comprises approximately 40 percent of global trade was always going to be an ambitious lift, with each country having its own priorities. But as negotiators scramble to finish an historic free trade agreement that has been years in the making and could reshape global trade rules, perhaps they should take a step back and revisit the reason behind that deadline. At this late stage, it will be

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