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piracy

Spoiler Alert! Illegal Downloaders Steal Content Even When Legally Available

The film and TV industry receives a lot of flak from critics for being its own worst enemy. If Hollywood studios want consumers to pay for content, the argument goes, then they should make it easier to download legally. If piracy is a problem for the industry, then maybe it should take a hard look in the mirror.

The only problem with this argument is that it’s completely false. KPMG just released a first of its kind study assessing the availability of movies and TV shows online. It found that as of December 2013, 81 percent of the 808 unique films studied were available on at least 10 of the 34 online video-on-demand (VOD) service providers. Only 50 of the films studied were not available on any of the 34 online video offerings that KPMG reviewed. The study also found rapid growth in the number of TV viewing options available to audiences. Overall, 85 percent of the most popular and critically acclaimed TV titles were available in the U.S. through legitimate online video services.

This development could not be timelier, with both the ramp up to the Oscars and Fall

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Cast pf Firefly

They Aim to Misbehave

Last Monday night, the television world was abuzz with anticipation for what seemed like the perfect end to the “McConaissance”: an Emmy, in the same year as his Oscar, for actor Matthew McConaughey’s performance in the acclaimed HBO drama True Detective. Defying all expectations (and perhaps the Vegas odds) McConaughey lost to repeat winner Bryan Cranston, for his equally acclaimed work on the hit AMC series Breaking Bad. The triumph of TV stardom over movie stardom is rare in Hollywood, and as host Seth Meyers noted at the beginning of the night, “[TV’s] not like that high-maintenance diva movies, who expect you to put on pants and drive all the way over to her house and buy $40 worth of soda.” Perhaps this is why TV is also gaining on movies in another area besides awards: piracy.

Piracy in TV is rapidly increasing, as just about every Emmy-nominated show—broadcast, cable, pay-per-view and streaming—suffers from illegal downloads. In fact, surprisingly, according to Tru Optik, it is Netflix’s Orange is the New Black (OITNB) that secured the second spot this year, behind oft-cited industry statistic, HBO’s Game of Thrones.

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The Expendables: Pirates vs. Action Heroes

Last week, the Expendables 3 was leaked online three weeks prior to the movie’s on-screen release date. It was downloaded close to 100,000 times in the first 12 hours and days later had already surpassed 500,000 downloads, making it the most pirated movie of the week.  Pre-release privacy costs films millions, while reducing creativity, stalling innovation, and harming free speech. While our beloved action heroes were unable to protect their movie from copyright infringement, the Internet community can adopt initiatives to reduce future leaks.

The Expendables III is not the first movie to be pirated before it was released in theaters. This type of leak has occurred for a variety of prominent movie releases, including Star Wars Episode III, Revenge of the Sith, Disney’s the Avengers and X-Men Origins: Wolverine, an incomplete work print copy of which appeared several weeks before the official theatrical release in 2009. Pre-release piracy hurts films because the people who are most interested in seeing the film are those most likely to pirate the pre-release, and therefore not pay to see it in theaters.

The Governmental Accountability Office (GAO) estimates that

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piracy graphic

China Acts on Digital Piracy

Digital piracy is a serious problem affecting content and software creators in a range of industries. In fact, at least 1 in 4 bits of traffic on the Internet is related to infringing content. One country in which piracy has been particularly rampant is China and the United States and international agencies such as the World Trade Organization have repeatedly called on the government to enhance enforcement.

Given this, there was some cause for optimism recently when the popular streaming video program, QVOD, was shut down by the Chinese government. The order cited the large amount of pirated and pornographic content that were delivered through the service as the key cause of the decision. In addition, the Chinese have also fined Kuaibo, the firm that runs QVOD, approximately $40 million for distributing pirated content. These actions symbolize the government’s larger effort to crack down on piracy and have led several large Internet sites, such as Sina, to publically apologize for distributing pirated or pornographic content.

It should be noted that pornography is illegal in China and some have argued that the actions by the government were designed principally to reduce

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Kim DotCom Thinks You Are a MegaIdiot

On Sunday evening, CBS’s 60 Minutes aired a report that reviewed the trials and tribulations of Kim DotCom—the self-styled villainous creator of the website MegaUpload. Prior to its infamous shutdown in 2012, MegaUpload was the premiere website for the illegal sharing of copyrighted works such as movies, TV shows, and music.

The 60 Minutes piece focuses primarily on the perspective of DotCom, including his delusion that he has been unfairly targeted by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). He repeatedly states that he should not be held responsible for the actions of his users; the website was designed for file sharing, and what his users chose to share is not his concern. In fact, DotCom expresses a desire for his work to be compared to that of movie heroes such as James Bond, only to have Bob Simon aptly point out that he is in fact much closer in persona to Dr. No — the flamboyant lifestyle, the private island, etc. It is this persona that DotCom alleges is responsible for the FBI targeting him, rather than the fact that he built a website designed to illegally exploit copyrighted works

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FTC in DC

Ending the Piracy Subsidy

What do information technology, intellectual property rights, and manufacturing have to do with each other? Everything. We focus on these issues at ITIF because they are more closely linked than ever and are integral to U.S. economic competitiveness and prosperity.

Therefore, I was glad to see over a dozen U.S. Senators from both parties (members of the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship) recently add their voices to a plea from the nation’s attorneys general for the Federal Trade Commission to crack down on foreign manufacturers who are ripping off U.S. intellectual property and using stolen information technology in their products. It signals a growing understanding that value-added manufacturing, intellectual property, and information technology are each important in their own right but also inextricably linked. These efforts also demonstrate a growing consensus that the U.S. needs to step up enforcement of commercial rights and obligations.

As ITIF has documented in compelling and sobering detail, the U.S. manufacturing sector has experienced declines worse than those of the Great Depression in the last decade.

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pirate-cyberlock-blog

There Be Pirates In These Clouds!

The U.S. Department of Justice announced in a statement that a grand jury had indicted seven individuals and two corporations with running an “international organized criminal enterprise allegedly responsible for massive worldwide online piracy of numerous types of copyright works.” Notably, law enforcement officials arrested top executives of Megaupload, including the infamous Kim Dotcom who was previously convicted of insider trading and embezzlement (and who had to be cut out of his mansion’s panic room where he hid with a sawed-off shotgun). Law enforcement also seized the domain and approximately $50 million in assets in the United States and eight other countries. So what are the takeaways from the MegaUpload indictment? And what are the implications for other cyberlocker services and cloud storage providers?

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