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Do Not Track

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Privacy Zealots Say “Cookies for Me, None for Thee”

This op-ed originally appeared in ComputerWorld.

Last week, Brendan Eich, the chief technology officer and senior vice president of engineering at Mozilla, announced that the organization is planning to block third-party cookies in future versions of the Firefox Web browser. In addition, the Center for Internet and Society (CIS) at Stanford Law School announced that it has created a new organization called the “Cookie Clearinghouse,” which will begin publishing blacklists for websites based on whether it believes a website’s particular usage of cookies “makes logical sense.” Mozilla will use these blacklists to decide which cookies to accept or deny.

Large-scale blocking of third-party cookies may have profound negative consequences on the future of the Internet. There are three main concerns. First, this practice will result in a loss of revenue from online advertising for many websites, and thus lead to less free content available to consumers. Second, it will cut off many legitimate business models for companies that collect and aggregate user data across the Internet to understand user behavior to design better websites, content and features. Third, it will limit the functionality of websites, both

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Cover of report "Privacy and Modern Advertising "

New Survey Shows Some Privacy Scholars Lack Objectivity

A survey funded by Nokia and conducted at the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology shows what has become increasingly apparent to those who follow this line of research: some of the most prominent academic researchers have ceased to retain even a veneer of objectivity in their research on privacy. The authors, Chris Hoofnagle, Jennifer Urban and Su Li, state that their survey shows that “Americans have a low level of knowledge about [Do Not Track], but prefer that it mean that websites do not collect tracking data.”

I won’t mince words here: this is shoddy research.

There are two main survey questions in their study related to Do Not Track (for more on this proposal and why it is a bad idea, see this or this). The first is a question about whether people have even heard of the Do Not Track proposal. The survey question reads, “Policymakers are considering creating a ‘do not track’ option for the internet. Have you heard of proposals for a ‘do not track’ system, or not?” Thirteen percent of respondents indicated that they had heard of the proposal; eighty-seven percent had not.

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